Monday, March 9, 2009

Thomas Jefferson's Legacy Remembered

POTC received this super email from a very forward-looking couple, and we felt it must be archived/posted forever:
President John F. Kennedy had this to say about Thomas Jefferson in 1962, when welcoming 49 Nobel Prize winners: "I think this is the most extraordinary collection of talent and of human knowledge that has ever been gathered together at the White House - with the possible exception of when Thomas Jefferson dined alone." The quotes below prove his point:
"My reading of history convinces me that most bad government results from too much government." "When we get piled upon one another in large cities, as in Europe, we shall become as corrupt as Europe." "The democracy will cease to exist when you take away from those who are willing to work and give to those who would not." "It is incumbent on every generation to pay its own debts as it goes. A principle which if acted on would save one-half the wars of the world." "I predict future happiness for Americans if they can prevent the government from wasting the labors of the people under the pretense of taking care of them." "No free man shall ever be debarred the use of arms. The strongest reason for the people to retain the right to keep and bear arms is, as a last resort, to protect themselves against tyranny in government." "The tree of liberty must be refreshed from time to time with the blood of patriots and tyrants."
In light of the present financial crisis, it's interesting to read what Thomas Jefferson said in 1802. The Psychology of the Call team thanks Joanna & Jim for this brilliant reminder of the reason for elected officials; are you listening dear sir Mr. President Obama?

6 comments:

Anonymous said...

Wish he'd come back!

Anonymous said...

Today's men are mice.
Avi

Anonymous said...

Barck's diss of Gordon Brown is APPALLING.
Adam

D-Speak said...

Why don't you post Jefferson's thoughts on BANKS, BANKERS and DEBT??

"We must not let our rulers load us with perpetual debt. We must make our election between economy and liberty or profusion and servitude. If we run into such debt, as that we must be taxed in our meat and in our drink, in our necessaries and our comforts, in our labors and our amusements, for our calling and our creeds...[we will] have no time to think, no means of calling our miss-managers to account but be glad to obtain subsistence by hiring ourselves to rivet their chains on the necks of our fellow-sufferers... And this is the tendency of all human governments. A departure from principle in one instance becomes a precedent for[ another]... till the bulk of society is reduced to be mere automatons of misery... And the fore-horse of this frightful team is public debt. Taxation follows that, and in its train wretchedness and oppression."

"The system of banking [is] a blot left in all our Constitutions, which, if not covered, will end in their destruction... I sincerely believe that banking institutions are more dangerous than standing armies; and that the principle of spending money to be paid by posterity... is but swindling futurity on a large scale."

"I believe that banking institutions are more dangerous to our liberties than standing armies. If the American people ever allow private banks to control the issue of their currency, first by inflation, then by deflation, the banks and corporations that will grow up around [the banks] will deprive the people of all property until their children wake-up homeless on the continent their fathers conquered. The issuing power should be taken from the banks and restored to the people, to whom it properly belongs."

"I, however, place economy among the first and most important republican virtues, and public debt as the greatest of the dangers to be feared."

"If the American people ever allow private banks to control the issue of their money, first by inflation and then by deflation, the banks and corporations that will grow up around them (around the banks), will deprive the people of their property until their children will wake up homeless on the continent their fathers conquered."

"I am not among those who fear the people. They, and not the rich, are our dependence for continued freedom. And to preserve their independence, we must not let our rulers load us with perpetual debt. We must make our election between economy and liberty, or profusion and servitude. If we run into such debts, as that we must be taxed in our meat and in our drink, in our necessities and our comforts, in our labors and our amusements, for our calling and our creeds, as the people of England are, our people, like them, must come to labor sixteen hours in the twenty-four, give the earnings of fifteen of these to the government for their debts and daily expenses; and the sixteenth being insufficient to afford us bread, we must live, as they now do, on oatmeal and potatoes; have no time to think, no means of calling the mismanagers to account; but be glad to obtain subsistence by hiring ourselves to rivet their chains on the necks of our fellow suffers. Our land-holders, too, like theirs, retaining indeed the title and stewardship of estates called theirs but held really in trust for the treasury, must wander, like theirs, in foreign countries, and be contented with penury, obscurity, exile, and the glory of the nation. This example reads to us the salutary lesson, that private fortunes are destroyed by public as well as by private extravagances. And this is the tendency of all human governments. A departure from principle in one instance becomes a precedent for the second; that second for a third; and so on, till the bulk of the society is reduced to mere automatons of misery, to have no sensibilities left but for sinning and suffering. Then begins, indeed, the bellum omnium in omnia, which some philosophers observing to be so general in this world, have mistaken for the natural, instead of the abusive state of man. And the fore horse on this frightful team is public debt. Taxation follows that, and in its train wretchedness and oppression."

"But with respect to future debt; would it not be wise and just for that nation to declare in the constitution they are forming that neither the legislature, nor the nation itself can validly contract more debt, than they may pay within their own age, or within the term of 19 years."

Don't use Jefferson for your own propaganda. Do you agree with these principles and thoughts as well???

D-Speak

Anonymous said...

I am using this site as my contrarian indicator and am making a killing.

The Call Team said...

Dear Contrarian,

What an exceptionally awful life you must lead if you get a kick out of posting something negative anonymously. Grow a pair.